resistance

film

In an alternate version of World War II, D Day has failed and the German forces have invaded the British Isles. In a remote Welsh valley the women wake one day to discover all the men have gone and a unit of German soldiers have taken up residence. What are the soldiers looking for and just where have all the men gone?

Resistance features some strong performances, an intriguing script (adapted from a popular novel) and lovely looking Welsh landscapes – ingredients for an absorbing drama. Why then, is it such a tedious experience?

The problem lies within the script. Populated with too many pregnant pauses and wistful flashbacks, it spends far too much of its running time being mysterious and ambiguous. The central relationship between Andrea Risebourough’s Sarah and the German Army Captain does not engage or convince enough to make you care what happens to either of them and the mystery of the missing men from the valley is eluded to on many occasions but never satisfactorily thought through. By the end there is just mild puzzlement instead of the emotional resonance from the pain it has caused these women.

Performances throughout are good but hampered by the heavy-handed direction which relies too much on windswept gazing across the valley. Wuthering Heights this is not! Resistance is a disappointment from such an interesting concept.

 

Best performance: Sharon Morgan showing total devastation when her prized horse meets an unfortunate end.

The great Michael Sheen has a tiny role, presumably only there to attract the finances.

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